Monthly Archives: July 2012

Promoting QR Code Use

In previous posts I have talked of how many people offer QR Codes to consumers with little in the way of incentives. The presence of a QR Code does not mean it will be used, people need to think that what they receive from doing so is worth while; this is why a QR Code linking to banal advertising will only discourage future use.

However Kenya and Uganda appear to be leading the way in making the most of this new technology. Small shops may not be able to introduce their own loyalty cards in the style of Tesco of ‘Nectar Cards’ in the UK but using the foursquare model of ‘checking in’ they gain both promotion and loyalty. So when a customer purchases something at a small business, say a cafe, they get a QR Code they scan which means they ‘check-in’ online and gain loyalty points. This seems to be a very logical solution, far better than reality many of us face with wallets and purses jammed full of loyalty cards you might only use a couple of times a year.

So it leads to free stuff for the customer and free advertising on someones timeline for the company and all without the use of a loyalty card. Sounds like Kenya and Uganda are leading the way in this area.

Jack

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QR Codes in History

A commission by the Scottish government for a tapestry has raised eyebrows this week as it has been revealed that they plan to include QR Codes within the tapestry. This will enable smart phone users to scan the codes and find out more about the scenes depicted. A bold move which will undoubtedly leave many recoiling in horror, but is it really that bad?

Firstly if it gets a few young people more engaged with the topic (Scottish Diaspora) of each panel then that is better than a tapestry without QR Codes which no one understands as well. Secondly as a historical item maybe it will give a better reflection of our time than a more traditional tapestry. Smart phones and QR Codes are part of how we now interact with media and the world at large, so why shouldn’t they be included in such objects?

The proof will really be in how much the QR Codes are used. This though shouldn’t be a problem to register. Unlike most forms of information/advertising where only a rough guess at the number of views a leaflet has got can be made QR Codes allow for very clear statistics; including time spent on the page with the information.

So I guess time will tell what we should make of this move but it certainly will attract some headlines.

Jack

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